Em-bark: Dogs Launch a River Walk in Cuenca, Ecuador


I was born in a city of rivers—three of them, to be exact.  And now, half a century later, I’ve moved to another—this time a town that has four flowing through it.

Admittedly, Pittsburgh’s rivers have little in common with those here in Cuenca.  These aren’t nearly as deep or wide, as the Ohio, for example.  These rivers are rockier.  Water flows more swiftly.

However, the river closest to our home and the park that parallels it have proven perfect places to walk the dogs—to appreciate the sound of water rushing over rocks—reminders of the hard places and our ability to move above or around them.

Sometimes we feel like this:

Between a rock and a hard place-- (Kathy's image)

Between a rock and a hard place– (Kathy’s image)

When the reality is more like this:

There's always a way out, over or around. (Sara's image)

There’s always a way out. (Sara’s image)

Certainly, Ecuador has rivers far grander than those in my mountain town.  The Amazon has its origin in Ecuador.  A body of water more icon than regular river, it conjures images of dark dreams and alien ambition—a river whose force impacts the collective imagination of an entire planet.

Still, today, we’d like you to join our walk along the humble but beautiful Tomebamba (which, ultimately, flows into the Amazon).  See what we see, hear what we hear, even meet the horse and chickens we encounter along the way.

Perhaps, the river will renew you, as it does us—as it does our dogs, as well.

Below we gather at our gate—about to em-bark.  And believe me, the dogs DO have plenty to say about it.

An adventure worth barking about-- (Sara's image)

An adventure worth barking about– (Sara’s image)

It quickly, as within 3 or 4 blocks, turns into a DOG and PONY show.

Horse in the hood!  (Kathy's image)

Horse in the hood! (Kathy’s image)

Still, Lucy and Ralph are the ones chomping at the bit—”Let’s get this show on the road!”

Lucy leads the way.  (Kathy's image)

Lucy leads the way. (Kathy’s image)

Ralph brings up the rear.  (Sara's image)

Ralph brings up the rear. (Sara’s image)

And even in our neighborhood of Totoracocha, where the horse also lives, street art marks this as an urban area, as well.

Sara and Ralph relax.  (Kathy's image)

Sara and Ralph relax. (Kathy’s image)

Dog-tag?  (Kathy's image)

Dog-tag? (Kathy’s image)

The river itself is, also, lovely.

103_2395

(Kathy’s image)

(Kathy's image)

(Kathy’s image)

(Kathy's image)

(Kathy’s image)

(Kathy's image)

(Kathy’s image)

Sometimes Sara and I photograph one another taking photos more than we photograph the river itself.

(Sara's image)

(Sara’s image)

(Kathy's image)

(Kathy’s image)

(Sara's image)

(Sara’s image)

And, of course, the dogs enjoy the walk, as well.  Ralph even takes a dip.

"Dog gone, why'd you make me get out?"  (Sara's image)

“Dog gone, why’d you make me get out?” (Sara’s image)

Lucy stays on shore.  (Kathy's image)

Lucy stays on shore. (Kathy’s image)

Interestingly, many of the dogs we meet along the way, look a lot like Ralph and even a bit like Lucy.

"Watchu lookin' at?"  (Sara's image)

“Watchu lookin’ at?” (Sara’s image)

These little dogs are everywhere.  (Kathy's image)

Little dogs like these are common in Cuenca. (Kathy’s image)

But the plants growing along the river also capture our imagination.  Are we barking up the wrong tree?

(Kathy's image)

(Kathy’s image)

Sara likes to mock my love of weeds.  (Kathy's image)

Sara likes to mock my love of weeds. (Kathy’s image)

Green is my favorite color!  (Kathy's image)

Green is my favorite color! (Kathy’s image)

These little orange flowers are everywhere. (Sara's image)

These little orange flowers are everywhere. (Sara’s image)

Sara appreciates the real thing--same flowers we held at our wedding!  (Sara's image)

Sara finds the same flowers we carried at our wedding! (Sara’s image)

Isn't this one stunning?  (Sara's image)

Isn’t this one stunning? (Sara’s image)

This is Cuenca’s “dry season,” so the river is low—the water flowing a bit more slowly—but quickly enough.

(Sara's image)

(Sara’s image)

(Sara's image)

(Sara’s image)

It’s time to head home, but it’s still hard to leave these towering trees behind.

(Sara's image)

(Sara’s image)

(Sara's image)

(Sara’s image)

(Sara's image)

(Sara’s image)

(Sara's image)

(Sara’s image)

The path home takes us past even more graffiti.

(Kathy's image)

(Kathy’s image)

(Kathy's image)

(Kathy’s image)

(Kathy's image)

(Kathy’s image)

And just past the street art, we encounter more farm animals.  This time it’s chickens and roosters and their babies, as well.

(Kathy's image)

(Kathy’s image)

(Kathy's image)

(Kathy’s image)

(Kathy's image)

(Kathy’s image)

(Kathy's image)

(Kathy’s image)

Once we’re home again, the dogs collapse in complete exhaustion—snoring away the rest of the day.

Let sleeping dogs (and Mommy) lie.  (Yes, this is an old photo.  Some of you have seen it before, but you get the point.  Right?)

Let sleeping dogs (and Mommy) lie.

(Yes, the photo above is an old one. Some of you have seen it before, but you get the point. Right?)

Thanks for coming along.  We hope you enjoyed Cuenca’s unique mix of urban and rural—and all in our small neighborhood.

Is there a river in your town?  Where do you walk your dogs?  Do you have farm animals living in your neighborhood?

82 thoughts on “Em-bark: Dogs Launch a River Walk in Cuenca, Ecuador

  1. Nature is stunning and sometimes dangerous. No rivers in my town because I live in the wilderness. “Dirty Creek” flows around the base of my mountain. When French explorers were in what is now Oklahoma ,before white men relocated hundreds of thousands of Indians to this area, they named that water Derdeinne; that was changed to Derde, later; then the name morphed into Dirty (Creek) back in the early fifties. Thick bush on both sides, water moccasins slithering about …..its just not ideal for a doggy-walk. Thats why I enjoyed walking with you this morning, Kathy, in that pristine place of clear rushing water & towering trees. The only thing missing was the sound of birds and breaking twigs under your petite feet. it was a lovely morning walk. Thank you Sara & Kathy.

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    • I’m tickled you enjoyed the walk, JK!

      It’s a lovely place for the dogs–and us humans, as well. Interesting to learn about the way language morphed eventually in “Dirty Creek.” I love learning those kinds of things.

      Yeah, the snakes sound less than inviting. I remember walking with you on your mountain. I wrote a poem about it. It remains one of my favorite. And I’ve kept a bone I picked up that evening. It’s in our 20 foot container steaming toward Ecuador–supposed to land in Guayaquil today, in fact. I’d love to walk with you again one of these days–either here or there will do.

      Great to hear from you.

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  2. So lovely. There were a group of ponds in my hometown that I loved to walk around. If you were watchful, you could often spot an alligator watching you from a far bank. My new home town doesn’t have alligators but it does have a fantastic waterfall right in the middle of downtown. I haven’t visited it as much as I should because parking downtown is a challenge. I miss the ponds and the alligators. Even though they’re a three hour drive away I often think about going.

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    • Fascinating comment, Nora. So did you grow up in Florida–and do you still live in the state? I’m realizing I really don’t know what city you’re in–downtown waterfall sounds wonderful!

      Great to hear from you. And thank you. I’m so glad you enjoyed the post!

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  3. Beautiful, Kathy (and Sara)! I am drawn to water for some reason. No water on our land but someday we hope to have a place that has a pond or stream or something—Chris’s ideal would be a trout stream and maybe someday. Who knows? Your pictures are such a wonderful glimpse into a the landscape of your surroundings. Thanks so much for sharing.

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    • I’m glad you enjoyed the post/walk, Beth Ann. A trout stream sounds lovely. It does amuse me, I must admit, that the Tomebamba is called a river at all–as it seems more like a creek or stream to me. Maybe something is lost in the translation. It would be interesting to know.

      But Ecuador is fun because we have so much topographical diversity–the Amazon in the east, the Andes running down the center, and stunning beaches along the Pacific coast to the west.

      Take care, my friend. And have a wonderful day. I’m drinking my morning tea—cheers!

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  4. Kathy,

    It seems that you’ve found a little piece of heaven. Beautiful–thanks for sharing, and I love and laugh at your photo captions. I’m sending your blog along to a friend (Richard Greissman), who I know will love it!

    Hugs from KY,

    Nikki

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    • Thanks for sharing my post with your friend, Nikki! Hope he, too, enjoys the walk. Ecuador is a beautiful country with so much bio-diversity–the Amazon, the Andes, the Galapagos Islands.

      I love hearing from you. Hope all is well at UK this fall. Hugs to you, as well! And come visit us one of these days!

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  5. That makes me want to take a walk down by the creek. I do find water rejuvenating, especially when it’s moving. Beautiful photos. How lucky to have the park and the urban/rural all within walking distance!

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    • Good point, Lisa. It’s MOVING water that is so wonderful to me, as well. Then it makes sound, which is part of what sooths and rejuvenates. So happy you enjoyed the photos. Thank you. Hope you have a wonderful day, my friend!

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  6. These are gorgeous, Sista! I really, really like the two of Sara and Ralph (and not just because I’m obsessed with your dog). What an odd mix of the urban and rural where you live. Makes for a very interesting life, I’m sure.

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    • It does make things interesting! So happy to hear from you. It’s weird also to live in a neighborhood where horses graze on the corner and chickens run around freely–suppose they are really “free range.” I think it would make a delightful setting for kids. Hope your week is going well, my dear. Your pizza this week looked yummy!

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  7. Thanks for that Kathy. I really enjoyed that walk with you. While here in London our walking has been restricted to pavements – I miss the walks we had in Wellington. Glad you are both enjoying your new life in Ecuador.

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    • Oh, you are so welcome. I’m glad you enjoyed our little outing. When we lived in Vietnam, our dogs had adjust to pavement walks, as well. Not the same, is it? Thanks for your comment. It’s wonderful to hear from you!

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  8. Nice metaphor of rivers and the philosophy of life — my statement here and your and Sara’s photos call to mind Thomas Wolfe’s “Of Time and the River.” Your post is beautifully written, Kathy. It is 94 F today here in central Delaware, so after being out all day shopping, coming home and seeing this, I am ready to jump through my computer monitor for a refreshing dip.

    I live right where the Delaware River (which runs thru Phila.) meets the Delaware Bay, about 15 min. drive across the marshes to the water. As for dogs and the water, I have dog sat for my friend’s white bichonpoo, Wallie, a dog who makes me want to go out and get five of him. My friend has a sailboat she keeps on the upper Chesapeake Bay. One day, Wallie was on the boat at dock, when he heard “People, People, PEOPLE!” He leaped off the boat to greet them, surprised to find himself swimming. My friend pulled him up by his long leash that was attached to his harness.

    I renewed my driver’s license today, and seeing that heavenly place where you live, my friend R., who commented above, asked me if when we get a federally compliant driver’s license, do we still need to get a passport to go to Ecuador. I said I don’t know. Do we?

    Also, love the graffiti colors and especially those two graffiti faces. Extraordinary artists.

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    • I’m so glad you enjoyed the post, Samantha. I saw on CNN this morning the forecasted heat for your part of the world today. Yikes! I’m afraid I’m not a fan of hot weather.

      About the driver’s license–congrats on your renewal. That can be tedious—especially in the heat!

      I’m not sure what a US driver’s license would have to do with a passport. (My brain may not be functioning properly at this point.) Everyone needs a passport these days to leave the US–even to go to Mexico or the Caribbean. Plus, you need an Ecuadorian visa–the simplest of which can be gotten at the airport here upon arrival–only good for 3 months.

      In order to drive in Ecuador, a US license will do you for 30 days, as which point I think you need to pursue getting one here. However, I’ve seen debate about this matter on the Yahoo Ecuador Expat Forum just in the past week. Now I’m told, however, that with a valid US license getting one here in Ecuador is fairly straightforward. I don’t know. We have found no need to drive here, since public transportation is so great–and CHEAP–25 cents a ride.

      Your friend’s dog sounds like a sweetie. Hope you have a wonderful evening.

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      • Thanks for your input on the driver’s/license passport thing, Kathy. I couldn’t find my birth certificate, so couldn’t get a federally compliant driver’s license (I can upgrade later). But, as I understand it, the fed. compliant license allows me to board trains and airplanes, but I would still need a passport to visit foreign countries, and the passport obtainable only with a fed. compliant license. When I’m serious about moving to Cuenca I’ll look into this in more detail. I’m 72 today — my b’day. We old people and middle class are getting squeezed out of the U.S. in our present economy. If I had somebody to move there w/me, I’d probably do it. It does sound inviting; and while I’d miss the ocean, I do love high altitude and thrive better in it.

        Oh, yes, that Wallie dog is a sweetie — but with a stubborn streak. If he doesn’t want to do something, he puts on the brakes and stares you down.

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      • Is a “federally compliant” drivers license different from a state-issued one? Or are all state-issued drivers licenses automatically “federally compliant?” I’m not familiar with that term.

        You would need a copy of your birth certificate to get a residency visa in Ecuador, but you can order additional copies of your birth certificate from the state where you were born. Just Google “birth certificates in ___________________”–fill in blank with the state you were born in. You should be taken to a state government website where you can order copies. It will take several weeks to get them–maybe a month. Ultimately those birth certificates would then have to be sent back to your state’s Secretary of State’s office to be apostilled. But that would be a long way down the line. You can Google apostille, as well. But basically during the Hague Convention diplomats came up with a way of legitimizing one another’s documents, and the apostille became the means for doing that.

        Have a great weekend, Samantha. And HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!!!!!!!!

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      • Thanks for the apostille info, Kathy. Interesting word. I will save the info. A federally compliant driver’s license is relatively new and different from your standard driver’s license; I think all states offer them now. To get one you have to present your old driver’s license, birth certificate, and two proofs of address, such as utility bill, voter registration card. They want you to prove you’re not an alien terrorist trying to get out of the country. I just didn’t want to pay another $20 to get another birth certificate from Pa., since I know I put my earlier copy from a couple years ago in a very safe place at home — not in the refrigerator, where I find some things — I checked. If you are born before 1967, which I am, it takes forever to get you birth certificate from Pa. — well, at least six to eight weeks. Hopefully, those born way before 1967, as I am, will outlive the wait to get their copy.

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      • Okay, when I said “a few weeks,” I was hoping your weren’t born in PA. I was born there in 62 and had to wait a couple of months for mine. They claim to be redoing something in the system–inventing it, if you ask me. Sara was born in Ohio in 1960 and got hers in a couple of weeks. Go figure.

        Interesting to learn about the new driver’s licenses. Good to know.

        Bet that birth certificate might still turn out to be in the frig! LOL Mine would be.

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      • Kathy — Pa. inventing a new birth certificate system — I think so — funny. Yes, my birth certificate might still turn up in the fridge — somewhere in the back with that mystery stuff that I keep meaning to get to. 😉

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  9. Gosh those colours are sumptuous! I loved the river walk and the artwork and, of course, Lucy’s hair bow — cuter than cute!

    glad your Ecuadorean adventure is treating you so well 🙂

    You’ll appreciate this: It’s been about 6 weeks since Frankie left us. Tonight, as I got the mail, the old Golden next door came bounding up to me for a pet and some loving. He looked at my house expectantly … then sadly … then sighed. I swear he sighed. He’s looking for Frankie. And when Frankie didn’t appear, he gave me one last full body doggie hug and bounded off. don’t you just love that? I do 🙂
    MJ

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    • Oh, MJ, how painful it is every time I think about anyone losing their pet. I’m so thrilled you got a dog-hug today. I’m sure Frankie was thrilled to have his friend pass it along to you! Dogs are so smart–and so precious! Glad you enjoyed Lucy’s bow. She’s a hoot.

      Wonderful to hear from you, my friend. Take care. I’m sure Frankie was sending his love today. I just believe that’s how the universe works, somehow.

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      • I know–the bow is a hoot. Sara laughs at my wanting to do that to her hair. Guess I should have had a little girl to dress up. I totally believe Frankie was sending love through his buddy. I love the way the universe works. Hugs to you, too, my friend!

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  10. There’s a creek that flows languidly by our townhouse development, and of course the mighty Columbia River separating Oregon and Washington. Plus dozens of streams, lakes, etc. I love the peacefulness and serenity of water settings. And while there are no farm animals in our actual neighborhood, there are horses and cows close enough that we get a whiff of them whenever the breeze blows just right. (Or just wrong, as the case may be).

    Thanks for sharing your walk with us!

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    • Oh, Mark, thank you for taking the time to leave a comment so close to your wedding. I can’t believe you have time. Sorry to hear about the whiff you get from time to time. Hugs and congratulations to you and Tara this week. I’m so happy for you both!!!!!!!

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  11. It looks like Ralph and Lucy are having a barking good time! How long of a walk is it from your house to the river?
    There is a small pond at the park near my house where dogs can wade in and swim. I’ve taken Reggie there, but he seems a little scared of the water. He has to be coaxed to put his paws in and then he immediately gets out.

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    • We were surprised the first time Ralph jumped into the “river.” I was, at least. I would think the water would be bitingly cold—flowing down out of the Andes like it is. I suppose, it’s about a 10 minute walk to the river. It’s a lovely setting with bike and walking trail, as well. I wonder what makes some dogs love the water and other to not. Take care, my friend. And tell Reggie, we send him love. Great to hear from you!

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    • Thanks, Frank. I will check out your post. Our “river” is less river than stream compared to the Ohio. I don’t know why they call it a river. I wonder if there isn’t a word in Spanish for a smaller body of flowing water. Say hi to the Ohio for me! Great to hear from you.

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  12. Such beautiful pictures, Kathy. So much to see! And what brilliant colors you find in nature. Would love to know, though, what was it like bringing your dogs with you? What was their experience and did they have to go into seclusion for a spell, whatever it is to make sure they’re not bringing in diseases? Was the experience for them pleasant enough? Just wondering!

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    • Great question about the dogs. Bringing them in was easy. There is no quarantine here or in the US anymore, for that matter. It’s all a matter of having proof of the proper immunizations and the correct paperwork–a document from the USDA that allows you to take the dogs out of the US–and then having it certified by the Ecuadorian consulate in Miami. Not all consulates do it. Lucy rode under the seat in front of me. Ralph went as checked baggage. That way, he was brought directly to us in the baggage claim area. It was all very straightforward. They’ve adjusted well. They seem quite happy. Our yard here is smaller but there are fun places to walk–like the river, which is about 10 minutes from our house–a 10 minute walk, that is. Also, dogs can travel on public transport here. They are on the buses fairly frequently.

      Great to hear from you, Monica. Let me know if you have any other questions!

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  13. Aw how cute is Lucy’s hair do ?!! Your new home looks amazing Kathy the landscape is beautiful even the graffiti 😉 are there many dangers around the river ? When ever I think of rivers in that part if the world piranha s come to mind :/ I’m living in a place with slight similarities we have beautiful big gum trees in east nsw and the town I live in has a huge river which is an ocean inlet with bull sharks and oysters being the main residents do you guys ever go fishing over there ? Xx kel

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    • I’m so happy to hear from you, Kel. We haven’t seen a single snake since we’ve been here. I’m sure there are snakes down in the Amazon basin, but we are high in the Andes–too high even for mosquitoes. Haven’t had a single mosquito bite since I left the US.

      We have not gone fishing–though I hear there is “fly fishing” here in the mountains and lots of fishing on the coast.

      Great to hear from you, Kel. Hug and kiss that baby girl for me!

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  14. Great shots Kathy (and Sara). Glad to know that Lucy and Ralph have adjusted so well to their new home. When an acquaintance of mine moved from Boston to NYC, her cat was so freaked out, it spent its first three days in a corner of the bathroom staring at the wall. Another reason why I so prefer dogs. That’s some pretty elaborate graffiti. Those artists would be right at home here in NYC.

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    • Some of the older gringos complain about the graffiti, but they are too old to appreciate street art, I suppose. I don’t like what’s here as much as what we saw in Haiti, however. There was one artist there who was amazing.

      Yeah, cats are temperamental, aren’t they? Dogs are so much more easy going–except for Lucy–who happens to be pretty uptight for a dog. God, can she bark. Sara’s father calls her “the Yapper.” LOL

      Glad you enjoyed the post, my friend. Hope you’re doing well. Bet you’ll be glad for fall and cooler temperatures. Take care————-

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  15. There is a “river”.

    I love your new neck of the woods. What colors! But then again, I suspect every place you go suddenly has a new and fresh burst of color. 😉

    The pictures are fabulous. I love seeing both of you, wait, all four of you. I love how wonderful you make life.

    Hugs (first!) 🙂 colleen

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    • I know–a “river!” It’s a hoot. I suspect there might not be a word in Spanish for creek or stream. I don’t know. I was just talking to my sister about this this morning, and she said that maybe folks here didn’t have any real rivers like the Mississippi. I had to point out that we did have the Amazon here. That’s sort of archetypal river!

      Glad you enjoyed the post and the colors. I think you all would enjoy riding along the bike path that parallels the river. Hug to you both!

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  16. Such beauty, both the pictures and your words tying what you see to the life. I must tell you I love the street art, always have loved street art, there is something wonderful about it, don’t you think?

    The butterfly picture is spectacular! I love the two of you take so many pictures of each other! I am camera shy, I have been told to stop being such a idiot but of the thousands of pictures of family and friends only 1% are of me. Seeing all of your wonderful pictures, of nature, your surroundings and each other, what wonderful memories you preserve, I must rethink my position.

    Love and Hugs
    Val

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    • Oh, Val, Sara is a lot like you about getting her photo taken. I often have to be sneaky. However, I have gotten some decent ones recently of her–ones she actually approves of. I, on the other hand, don’t mind it at all.

      I’ll tell Sara you enjoyed her butterfly photo. I, too, thought it was pretty cool! I’m delighted you enjoyed the past. Hope your week is going well. Hugs and love to you, too!!!!!!

      We love street art, as well! Saw some great stuff in Haiti, by the way.

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  17. Hooray! WordPress fixed whatever was keeping me from getting post updates. Now I can catch up. *Thank you* for taking us on a tour of your new environs. More! More! More! Such abundance and color. You guys must be in heaven. And the “dark dreams and alien ambition” line was stunning—absolutely captured my feel for the Amazon. Oh, how I’ve missed you guys!

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    • Bless your heart, Sandy. Who knows how those kinks get into the system. I, too, am delighted it’s fixed!

      To be honest, we DO feel like we’re in a heaven of sorts. This is a lovely country, and so far, there simply isn’t a down-side to being here. So happy you liked my line about the Amazon. Now we just need to actually visit the Amazon. LOL Take care, my friend. Hugs to you!!!!

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  18. Wow, Kathy! You’re surroundings in Ecuador are just gorgeous! What a beautiful, interesting place!

    There are no rivers in my town, exactly. I’m in a suburb, though, so I’m very close to the Mississippi and also to the St. Croix River – both beautiful in their own way.

    As for dog walking, we do that right in our suburban neighborhood. And yes! There are farm animals. The land where our development was built used to be farmland. The farm still functions to a small degree and the barn still houses cows and sheep. Sometimes on our walk, Lucy and I walk past the farmhouse and the cows wander over to the fence that runs right along our walking path. Lucy is fascinated by those enormous “dogs!”

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    • How funny that Lucy is confused by the farm animals! Makes perfect sense, doesn’t it? Silly Lucy! Isn’t it funny how we love our dogs to much?! They are dear.

      I’ve never been to Minneapolis–didn’t even know you didn’t have a river. I’ve heard you have lakes, however.

      Great hear from you, Terri. Hope you all have a wonderful weekend!

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    • How cool to have goats! I haven’t seen any in our immediate neighborhood yet. However, you can get fresh goat milk delivered to your house each day. Our neighbors across the street do.

      Great to hear from you, Mun. So happy you enjoyed the post. Thank you. Have a wonderful weekend!

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    • I suppose there may be some snakes somewhere, but we are too high in the mountains for tropical ones. Have, indeed, not seen any mosquitoes. And believe me, if they were here they would have found me by now! They always do.

      Can’t wait for you all to see it in person! Hope your brother is doing better, David. Please keep us posted!

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  19. Since I live in the SF bay area, I have no rivers to admire, but I do have the bay and beyond, the Pacific Ocean. Water sooths, whether it be river or lake, bay or ocean. Your photos are soothing and wild at the same time. And I love the rock between a hard place!!! Wonderful post.

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    • Oh, I think the bay and Pacific are WAY BETTER than any old river! I’m a fan of the sea. I’m so happy to hear from you, Pam, and glad you enjoyed the post. Thanks for stopping by. Hope to see you again soon! Loved your “switcheroo” with Kathy!

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  20. A lovely snapshot of a day in Cuenca – I could almost smell those flowers. So great you and Sara seem settled and relaxed – you make moving across the world look so easy.

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    • Interesting that you think we make international moves look easy. I think that is sort of how we feel–not exactly that it’s easy, but not nearly as hard as one might think–at least for us. Glad you enjoyed the post, Deanna. It’s great to hear from you!

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  21. Love the dog pictures. I used to live near a canal which had some beautiful walks. There’s a river near my new flat called black water but I’ve only walked a small way along it so far and I don’t have any dogs to give me the motivation

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  22. Kathy, this was such a fun walk! It feels like we know a little bit more about Cuenca now. I, too, am an avid lover of weeds. Except, truly, is there such a thing as a “weed”? So often they are as beautiful as flowers. Thank you both for bringing your cameras along and sharing your walk with us.

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    • You are so welcome, Kathy! I have to agree with you about weeds. Who is it that makes those distinctions, anyway? Glad I’m not the only one who feels that way. Thanks for reading and leaving a comment. It’s wonderful to hear from you!

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    • Thank you so much, Jessie. We love it here. Well, there’s just so much to appreciate, it’s hard not to love this country. Glad you can see it, as well. I’ll tell Ralph and Lucy you think they’re cute–something new for them to bark about!

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  23. Thank you! That was a wonderful walk. You live in such a gorgeous area with such a mix of things. We have a creek at the back of our property that is, to me, the size of a river. It flows to a river and then to a bay and then out to the ocean. No dogs, just cats (who don’t go outside for walks, but can walk up and down walls…lol!), and we got rid of the rooster than came with the house. He now lives at a farm down the road and we still hear him every morning.

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    • How funny that a rooster came with the house! Hope he doesn’t wake you.

      Yes, we live in lovely area. In fact, we visited another gorgeous place this past weekend. If I can assemble it in time, it should post this week.

      Great to hear from you, Robin!

      Like

  24. Great to see your ‘hood, Kathy! There’s a bunch of (sanctioned) street art around our apartment, too, and it gets re-painted regularly, so I’m always out taking new photos of it.

    I grew up in a city with two rivers (one of which flooded terribly this summer), but now it’s ocean all the way. There’s something so grounding about water, though, be it a stream or the Pacific itself.

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