Bad Hair Life: The Ecuador “Uncut” Edition


Mine has been a bad hair life.

And moving to Ecuador hasn’t helped matters.   If anything my hair is worse than ever.

I’ve tried it all, everything from headbands to bangs–all an effort to make thin, fine hair thicker and fuller, an evolution from baby bald to big girl curl.

So in honor of our one-year, move-to-Ecuador anniversary, a year that’s left my hair uncolored and grayer than ever, I’ve decided to recreate a scrapbook of styles—to rewrite my history in pixies and perms, bobs and barrettes.  Hope you enjoy.

A Baby in Bangs:

My mom was big into bangs, or so it seemed to me. Maybe it was the era–what one did with babies’ hair in the early ’60s.  Either way, I wore my toddler locks chopped short across the forehead, a bridge of bang above big, blue eyes.


Growing up with Brown Hair and Braids:

After first grade I insisted on growing my hair long.  It may have been the Brady Bunch effect—seeing Cindy with blonde ponytails and big bows.  It may have been primary school, an effort to braid my brown into bigger girl style, curly girl chic.   Regardless, I started second grade, a studious girl with lengthier locks.   

Professional Permed:

I finished my formal education in the mid-eighties—a time when huge hair was everywhere.  It was an era before products could mousse any hair into almost any style; and big-headed professor or not, with thin, fine hair, only a perm gave me personal puff.

Mad-Headed Medusa:

I lived much of the ’90s fighting bipolar disorder.  It was a decade spent revolving in and out of psychiatric hospitals with hair as varied as my mood.  Sometimes it was short, other times a little longer—even eventually I had mildly Medusa-like curls.

Lesbian Locks:

I emerged a saner, better version of myself after the millennium turned, embracing my sexuality and cutting my curls.  Whether or not I unconsciously morphed into the stereotype of cropped lesbian locks, I’ll never know.  However, I spent the first half of the last decade opening the closet door— gay pride with pixie cut.

A Blogger in Bobs:

When I returned to work mid-decade, I marked my passage back to the writing life by bobbing my hair and falling madly sanely in love.  With Sara, I’ve lived, luggage packed, passport in hand, first in Vietnam, later in Haiti.

Ecuador Uncut:

I wondered a while back what haircut I’d have for our next international destination.

So here you have it, folks.  It’s long.  Uncut.  And grayer than ever.

kathy P1000421 (3)

ecuador uncut 103_2234 (4)

One final photo that I'm adding after posting.  Here I am recently with braids.  (Could not locate a better version of this photo.)

One final photo that I’m adding after posting. Here I am recently with braids. (Could not locate a better version of this photo.)

How has your hair evolved?  Do you have a story to tell in bangs and barrettes?

117 thoughts on “Bad Hair Life: The Ecuador “Uncut” Edition

  1. You have great hair – thick with lots of body – and a beautiful face so any of those styles looked good – but I think I like the longer bob on you the best 🙂 Rock it sister!
    MJ

    Like

  2. Dearest K.,

    From the earliest photo’s you could have been my little sister.

    As a professional I deem your Ecuadorian Coiffure most appropriate, that is, unless I’m residing in your quest room…

    Adorable post.

    Cheers,

    R.

    Like

    • Oh, thank you, my dear. Yes, your name is, indeed, HAIRY Robert–isn’t it?! Wonderful to hear from you today, my friend. Hope you have a lovely day. So glad you enjoyed the post–and I love knowing I could have been your sister!!!!

      Like

  3. I love your childhood pictures. In that first one you look rather like the Gerber baby, and it’s fascinating to see how your hair has evolved. Mine too, I suppose. Mine was the opposite of yours, I think. Thick, black and curly. My mother would call it a “tomoosa.” Not sure the spelling, but that’s how the Spanish word is pronounced?
    Back when everyone was wearing their hair straight, we tried to tame it to no avail. Finally, my mother gave me a pixie cut, which I found humiliating, especially when a few said I looked like a boy. I finally embraced my curls in high school, only to cut it all off in college through most of my thirties. I thought it was easier to manage but it wasn’t an attractive look at all. Finally, post-divorce I let it grow and once again embraced the curls. I think you have grayed gracefully. Looks good on you. But I’m not ready, and still get my hair colored, despite the expense.

    Like

    • So sorry to hear about your hair history. I LOVE your telling of it, however. So glad you finally decided to embrace the curls. I think your hair always looks lovely in all of the photos I’ve seen. And believe me, I haven’t embraced the gray without kicking and screaming. When I go back to the US next month, I will most certainly color it again.

      Thanks for the comment, my friend. Hope you have a wonderful day!

      Like

  4. Great hair throughout the ages my friend! 🙂 I have been blessed with not a lot of thin hair my whole life. I have run the gamut of long, short, bangs, fringe, no bangs and even baldness after chemotherapy which worked great b/c I never had a bad hair day b/c I wore a wig (or nothing!) Originally I’m dark brunette, but now I”m sporting blonde locks due to increased grey which came back with a vengeance after chemo. I’ve been red, a brief stint w/orange (hairdresser changed immediately!), dark brown, highlighted blonde and now just blonde to hopefully hide the grey. As far as I’m concerned, hair is an accessory to enjoy and yours looks great! 🙂

    Like

  5. Those ponytail holders and yarn-ribbons bring back memories!
    Your hair journey reflects all the popular styles of each decade and you’ve rocked them all, while your eyes have stayed just as blue.

    Like

  6. Now heres something to write a blog about!!! LOL One can always count on humor for you Miss Kathy!!

    I am sure we all followed some trend or other when it came to personal grooming. Expect now in our mature age! Ha ha!

    Like

    • Oh, Jeff, thank you! So glad you enjoyed the humor! You know, you look like YOU still have lots of hair–which is awesome, is it not?! Rock it, my friend. Rock it! I LOVE hearing from you, my dear! Hope you have an awesome day!

      Like

  7. You and share a childhood (are we sisters of another mother?). Do you know what they say in Texas?

    “The bigger the hair the closer to God”. I went through the big hair stage, but then I moved to the NW and with big boobs, a Texas drawl and big hair every interview I went on my IQ was immediately shaved by 60 points. I had to do something! Lowering my hair and losing my drawl (at least a little) were my choices (I kept the boobs).

    Personally, I loved the cropped look! You have great bone structure and I thought this looked fabulous on you. As to now, Kathy you still look wonderful. You are loved and beautiful. You shine with it.

    Hugs and Love from Tejas

    XX

    Like

    • Yes, yes, we are sisters, dear Val! That’s all there is to it! Glad to know you kept the boobs. I’ve kept mine, as well. I DO know what they say in Texas, as I lived in Dallas for a few years. I’m afraid to say, I hated it. YOUR hair always looks awesome, Sister! Thanks you, my friend. As always, I LOVE hearing from you!

      Like

  8. Growing up in northwest Arkansas I was a typical young boy with very short hair, what they called a flat top. No hair touched my ears. Later, in high school, a problem of sorts happened. It was called the Beatles and their long hair. In my part of the ozarks, or shall i say the bad part of the ozarks – but that is an entirely different story, long hair was not allowed in high school. As such my hair was long on top but still did not touch my ears. During my senior year I let my hair go and it did indeed brush against my ears. I was expelled from high school and told not to return unless my hair was cut. Being one of those ‘I’m going to college because I will be a scientist’ nerds I did cut my hair back away from my ears.
    Off to college at Tulsa University as a chemistry major. My hair continued to grow. Because tuition was going up at TU I switched to the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville for my sophmore year and switched my major to biology. My hair not only covered my ears but was below my shoulders. In the area where I grew up, not only was long hair not allowed in high school, but it was not appreciated by the locals. At one point I was called a ‘long hair’ and had a knife pulled on me. Fortunately I escaped with my life and my long hair. By the time I graduated from college my hair was down to the small of my back. John Lennon was still one of my hero’s.
    While completing a masters degree in forest ecology my daughter needed surgery that was not covered by insurance. One way to have the surgery performed was to join the army. They also did not like my ling hair so it was gone, but the surgery was performed for free. I also had my wisdom teeth, that were not bothering me, removed. For a bit over nine years my hair was short. At one point, in officers candidate school, my hair had to be at least 1/8th inch long but not over 1/4th inch. One day, while visiting a California town, I open the door and looked into a bar but decided not to go in. As I released the door and turned away someone in the bay yelled out ‘ go away, we dont want any short hairs in here.’
    When I got out of the army in 1987 I enrolled at the University of Georgia and let my hair and my beard grow. Nine years of shaving every day had been too much. My hair has not reached below my shoulders again but would have definately gotten me kicked out of high school.

    Like

    • I totally LOVE hearing your hair history! I went to a small Baptist high school near Pittsburgh were boys hair was not allowed to touch their ears or collars–though I am from a later generation than you, I think. I understand that kind of thinking, in a way.

      Interesting that you ended up in Tulsa, as I lived there for nearly a decade and had close ties with TU and knew a number of folks who had attended and taught there. None in the sciences, however.

      Wonderful that you joined the military so your daughter could have the surgery she needed. Sorry you had to get your hair cut.

      Again, I enjoyed getting your comment. Hope to hear from you again soon. Thanks so much for stopping by!

      Like

    • Thank you so much, Andra! I still get a chuckle out of seeing those old photos. And it’s great that you don’t get bored with your hair. I always do for some reason. I LOVED getting your comment, my friend!

      Now, when shall we do our hike of the Inca trail–or are you burnt out on the walking thing?

      Like

  9. I have a theory that we each have maybe one era per lifetime – two if we’re extremely lucky – where our hair (or height or body type or anything else that is out of our control) will fall in line with current styles. I had about ten minutes in the late sixties, early seventies when my long, thick hair seemed like the perfect accessory. The rest of my life it has just been a struggle. As for coloring, I am too poor and too lazy to keep up with it. I had to embrace the gray. I loved this post, and the trip – through photos – of your journey! Thanks, Kathy!

    Like

    • I hear you, Cindy. I haven’t done much with my hair recently, since I didn’t want to spend the money–or maybe I’m just lazy. LOVE your theory about only looking good for maybe one era. I think you have a point there! Now, if only my best were yet to come. Alas–I fear that’s not the case. Damn!

      Thanks for stopping by, my friend!

      Like

  10. My hair hasn’t changed much in the last 15 years….looks much like my high school senior yearbook picture. Long and pulled back in a ponytail. Joe likes it that way, and being the “good wife” that I am I wear it that way. It’s just hair. If it makes him happy I’m good with that. Plus it is very easy. I like to think I’m “low maintenance”….no make up, hair pulled back. Although I’m beginning to wonder at what age I should cut it. I’ll be 57 in a week….seems a little old for long hair. And Kathy, gray hair is beautiful. It reminds me of the greatness of a bald eagle.

    Like

    • Oh, yes, that’s a great comparison, Janice. I remember always admiring your long hair when I was a kid. You were my model of all I wanted to be. Funny to think now that you are only 5 years older than me. It seemed so much more back in the early 70s. Sara likes my hair long, too. I pull it back. It’s easy. I love low-maintenance, too. Hugs to you, dear Janice!

      Like

      • I had to laugh at the “lesbian locks”. The last time I did cut my hair my son asked “how short”? It was pretty short for me. I said….”pretty short”. He replied: “Lesbian short?”. At that time I had never heard of the term. But that explains it.

        Like

  11. Oh, the travesty our hair becomes. This entire post made me smile so big. My mother was a hairdresser so you can imagine what I’ve been through. I cannot complain at all, though. We were all blessed with great hair, except for one thing. When it’s short it has cow licks. Seriously. But that made her just go way overboard sometimes. You can imagine what she did to us (THREE girls)! Sitting in her chair she was always up to something. Today I sit here a medium blonde high-lighted long length. Wash twice a week so can’t complain at all. It’s still hanging, literally, in there. Still can’t do short hair. Sticks out in ghastly ways.
    Thanks for making me smile today. Nice post!

    Like

    • Oh, thank you, Alexandria. Interesting to hear that your mother was a hairdresser. I can only imagine what that might have meant for you and your sisters. Your current style sounds lovely and much like what I want.

      I SO appreciate your stopping by and taking the time to leave a comment. THAT made ME smile!

      Like

  12. I think this post resonates with most women because we have all been there. I still am. I had a lot of the same styles you had except I also had the long stringy haired look in my early teens. 🙂 I don’t think you quite achieved that gorgeous look. These days I am lucky to have the grey covered. The style disappears the day after the visit to the salon….great post.

    Like

    • Oh, thanks, Beth Ann! Yes, I missed the long stringy stage, for the most part, but not entirely. My hair has always been too thin and fine to do long hair very well–though I love it. And the more I respond to comments on this post, the more I am wanting my hair colored again. The gray makes me feel old. Great to hear from you today, Beth Ann. So glad you enjoyed the post!

      Like

  13. Fantastic post. It makes me want all your back (combed) story right now! Guess I have to wait for the memoir though? I laughed loads but was also really sad to ‘hair’ there were sadder times, pre Sara, when your hair was erm, straighter. Could pun all day but I will stop now. 😉
    So timely for me too. Thought I would try a little henna to lift my dulling colour and have had a week of hair looking a tinge less ginge and more burgundy. Managed to tone it down with some oiling and shampooing.
    Also, just bumped into an Egyptian friend who let me peek under her hijab. She’d had a huge fight with her husband over something she didn’t want him to do. When he did it anyway she chopped off her waist length hair and now has a funky bob. Told her about the sixties play Hair and hoe hair and nudity are tools of revolution!

    Like

    • You know your comments are always such fun! And how had I thought NOT to do the straight puns? LOL Goodness, that was begging to be done. But you did it for me, which is even better. Love the story about your Egyptian friend. Hair rocks! Hair is, indeed, a tool of the revolution! Hugs to you, my friend. I know how busy you are these days, so THANK YOU so much for taking the time to leave a comment!

      Like

  14. My daughter was looking at old photos the other day and pointed out that my hairstyle is basically the same as it was in 1986. So, I guess the answer for me is: nope. (I like your current hairstyle best. Seriously. Don’t sweat the gray).

    Like

  15. I love this!! What lovely pictures you have of yourself! Your gray is actually very lovely and white. I don’t think the page would be large enough to post my hair history. Let’s just say that the 70s Farrah Fawcett style and the big hair period of the 80s is where my über thick mop would be at it’s most natural! However, because I’m a total priss-butt when it comes to my hair, I have it in a modified, spikey pixie with a long side bang and lots of blond highlights. Oh, the money I’ve spent on hair products!!! Have a beautiful day! 🙂

    Like

    • So, so happy to hear from you, my friend. I love the description of your current hair. My sister had the Farrah Fawcett style way back when, and she has recently returned to it. Looks great on her. Wish I had enough hair to pull off that look. Have a wonderful day, and thanks so much for stopping by!

      Like

  16. Your hair sure has evolved and continues to evolve, Kathy. When I graduated high school I basically shaved my head in pursuit of the militant lesbian look, but only succeeded in looking like a child with cancer. I have pretty much had the same medium length hair ever since, but the rich chestnut brown color has been man (actually my colorist is a woman) made every four weeks this entire millennium. Maybe if/when I get lucky in love I’ll go gray … Maybe not. Cue Carly Simon singing “You’re So Vain”.

    Like

  17. Bravo to you for showing your hair-volution. 🙂 I have a hate-hate relationship with my hair. As you have noticed, I rarely post photos of myself. Why? Because my hair is a frizzy, thin, crazy rat’s nest most of the time. When I was growing up I longed for the Farah Fawcett look. Ha!

    Like

    • Thanks, Jackie. LOVE the “hair-volution” term. Gonna have to borrow that, if you don’t mind. I didn’t notice anything wrong with your hair, but then again, I have thin fine hair, too. And I don’t have the curls, which I’ve always wanted. Alas—A-lack, I suppose. Great to hear from you, Jackie!

      Like

  18. It’s always good to hear from you! My styles of the era are similar along the way so I do think there’s something about bangs being the fashion of the time. I didn’t go for the big hair 80’s, but I did let mine get long. I love you in pigtails and in the pixie cut. What’s best is what works for the lifestyle – don’t you think?

    Like

    • Congratulations on foregoing the big hair! That is admirable. In fact, I always admire anyone who bucks a tend. Glad you liked me in ponytails and pixies. I preferred the former. I suppose I still do, if the recent photo of me in braids is any indication. Great to hear from you today, Lisa. Thanks so much for stopping by!

      Like

  19. My father’s religious beliefs (or maybe just his penchant for long hair) kept me from cutting mine while growing up. When I was 18, I cut it all off and shaved the back of my head. It was long again for my wedding, but since it’s had many different looks, all short!

    Like

  20. I LOVE THE SHORT HAIR DIDS! And by the way, since I have worn my hair the same way for almost 15 years I am amazed at the feedback. I have women in their 80s and 90s who LOVE it. And I wasn’t even in a closet and have been asked more times than I can remember if I am gay or a man. 🙂 So many true stories about THAT! My favorite pictures are your pixie cuts! 🙂

    Like

  21. Wonderful hair trip through time. Love the pictures. Yes, my hair has been cut every imaginable way. My Mom is a hair magician. She can do anything with hair and spoiled me by doing mine for while I was growing up and then again when she visited. Unfortunately, none of her talent rubbed off on me so these day my long hair is more often than not pull through the back of a baseball cap. There is hope tho my teen can French braid it (learned from a You Tube video—tells me the girls love it when he offers to French Braid their hair 😀 )…with luck and the girls encouragement he will branch out and I will have better do’s.
    BTW I didn’t post El Morno today but it is hairdresser appreciation day! Your in sync!

    Like

    • OMG–how funny! Had no idea that Hair Dresser Appreciation Day even existed, let alone that I had managed to post this on THAT day! Hilarious!

      Good for Cole for learning to French braid. I’m sure the girls LOVE it and him for doing it. Wise young man!

      Hope you are having a lovely spring day up there in Chicago! Thanks for stopping by!

      Like

  22. Oh honey, you’ve been through it. You could open up yourself a hair museum if you were ambitious enough. I didn’t know Caucasian had this kinda experience. You may wanna do the short do again. But don’t listen to me. I have a short do and I’m partial. You’re making much ado about nothing, really. Scissors always have a way of solving your issue.

    Like

    • Oh, yes, hair can be a bitch for us, too. I’m on my way to open the museum even as I type this. Maybe it will take my mind off the reality of the hairy reality in which I find myself. LOL Cut it out, my friend. No teasing–or punning, for that matter, allowed. LOL

      Like

  23. Kathy – Oh my gosh, I love this UNCUT edition; your post title is perfect! I am silver-locked too and I love it — I’ve earned every single solitary one of my silver hairs; I consider them badges of courage. I think my favorite style on you is the 7th photo from the bottom — short, Short, SHORT.

    Like

    • You wear your short, gray hair SO well, Laurie! It becomes you. Don’t know if I pull it off, as well. I’d be tempted to try it again, to be honest, but Sara HATES it that way. Wonderful to hear from you, my friend. Hope all is well in your new home!

      Like

  24. Oh boy I can relate. I have horrible hair. Thin, mousy brown, and three unfortunately cowlicks. I have to keep it relatively short so it doesn’t just hang there limply. Many hair stylists have insisted they can curl my hair, but they usually quit after the first hour. It will hold a curl for a few minutes. The left side of my head holds a curl much longer, making the whole do look even funnier. Oh well.

    thanks for sharing the photos. I also tried the perms in the late 80s/early 90s. Not sure I have photos though.

    Like

    • Oh dear, TB, your situation sounds truly hairy. Seriously, that’s a horrible combination of issues. Sounds to me like a hat is in order. That’s been my most recent effort to fix things–cover it all up. Shaving my head may be next. LOL

      Thanks for stopping by. Wonderful to hear from you today!

      Like

  25. Great pics! I did do the “flip” for awhile in my younger days, then the long pigtails, I loved that…and was too old for the Farrah thing, (thank goodness!) after a few years of the “shag” (remember that?) I then went short and curly “wedge” style (permed) for most of my life. I actually got the nerve to do the pixie last year, couldn’t afford the perms and a friend ( she was young, I kinda felt silly) did it and it was sooo cute. welllll NOT on me!! of course I couldn’t afford a haircut either, so I did it myself, (which I have always done, but never a pixie) and I lived with that for a whole year, every single day HATING it, even though EVERYONE, even my guy friends, said it looked really great, I didn’t feel it. Thankfully got a hair stylist to trade for my business ( I can also trade dinners and automotive work! LOVE that) and I had her cut my pixie for the first appointment, hoping it was just the way I was cutting it… NOPE, still hated it and am happily now back to a relaxed curl on my Wedge cuts! I am sooo glad I took my Dad’s side for hair, he didn’t get gray until he was like 80 and I’m 62 and just getting gray on my temples now. I do love your hair short! What a great story and glad you had so many pics to go with it!

    Like

    • Oh, yes, Sue–I remember those styles. Well, actually, I only remember the flip from photos, but the shag and wedge were styles I also sported. I did fairly well with the latter. You are so fortunate to only now be getting just a bit of gray. Goodness, you’re 10 years older than me. However, I had my first gray hair as a teenager. I kid you not. It really is in the DNA. Wonderful to hear from you, my friend. As always, thanks for stopping by.

      Like

  26. I loved this! You had me laughing all the way through. I love the “dos” at every stage, because they really do tell the story of a life. I could do a photo essay of my life in head bands! And I have the photos of the big hair in the 80s, even though my hair is naturally thin. I had permanents from the time I was about five until fifteen years ago when I finally put my foot down and said “no more!” Your Ecuador hair suits you–you have “artist” hair. I think it’s a great look! You look completely at home with yourself, and that’s the look I like the most! 🙂

    Like

    • You’re sweet, Debra. Thank you. Perms can be really helpful in making thin hair look fuller. In more recent years, I had to choose between curl and color–not easy. I’ve needed both. Glad to hear I have “artist” hair. Not sure what that looks like exactly, but I LOVE the idea of it. Wonderful to hear from you, my friend. Hope you are well!

      Like

      • Ha! I should probably give a little idea of what I mean. I think of an artist’s unselfconscious eye that moves with the moment. The focus isn’t on creating a static impression, but moves with a creative impulse, re-creating as the flow changes. By that dynamic I really do see the artist in your spirit that is illustrated by the photos of your “hair by decades.” 🙂

        Like

  27. Well, it seems no matter what hairstyles you’ve worn, they’ve always been flattering. I know we all think we have bad hair, but in you, I don’t see it. You seem to have figured out how to make the most of your hair’s temperament. And in every photo, your smile and your eyes exude confidence, and I think that is one of the most important elements to true beauty.

    My hairstyles through the early years were much like yours. By three years old, I was very blonde and always with pony tails. By 6 years old, my blonde hair became darker and my mom had it cut to medium length. I think she grew tired of fighting her tomboy daughter to brush it out for school each day and by first grade, I had a pixie cut like so many other girls. I spent the eighties in perms and a style which my mom referred to as “wings.” She was forever telling me that I looked like I was ready to take flight. (Gee, thanks, Mom!) Since the eighties, I’ve had varying lengths of hair and shades of blonde. I’ve now settled into a medium length, low maintenance style but have yet to let my natural color take over. I’m not exactly sure what that color is, but I know it contains some strands of gray!

    Oh… and my ‘can’t live without’ product is volumizing mousse!

    Like

    • Thank you, Terri. LOVE, LOVE, LOVE reading your hair history–or shall I call it a hair-story? We are of the same generation, so it makes sense that we could have gone through similar stages. Now your hair always looks LOVELY in the photos I’ve seen. But when will we meet in person? I think a trip to Ecuador is in your future! LOL Hugs to you, my friend!

      Like

  28. I smiled right through your post, Kathryn. I also have fine thin hair, and have gone most of the routes that you have. I often think to myself. “If I’d been at the front of the queue when the hair was being handed out, I could have conquered the world.” 😀

    Like

  29. EVERY one of those hairstyles are breathtaking!:) I especially love the lesbian pixie. I just cut all of my locks off into a bob with bangs…staying with the times and all. I think you look fabulous natural and gray…just go with it!!

    Like

    • Oh, Tia, you are always so sweet. Thank you, my friend. Somehow it doesn’t surprise me that you like the pixie best. Congrats on the half-marathon! You rock!!!! Hope your week is going well!!

      Like

  30. Aw Kathy you are a beauty! You are so naturally photogenic (you lucky thing!). None of your smiles are staged! It’s amazing to see how a haircut can change an image. Of course you are truly ‘you’ in each of the photos; your energy, personality and warmth are the same throughout but we can almost mark history I guess by looking at the hairdos of our ladies!

    I always wanted blonde hair so I used to peroxide it in my 20s. Thankfully my scalp coped! Your current hairdo is beautiful.

    I wonder if there is a local fashion amongst the Cuenca ladies for hairstyles? I know that long pulled back pony tails can be quite a European fashion.

    Thank you for sharing this superb post, so full of heart and engaging truth!

    Hugs

    Lita

    Like

    • It’s wonderful to hear from you today, Lita! So happy you enjoyed the hair photos. Glad you survived the peroxide decade. LOL

      Interesting question you ask about a Cuencano hairstyle. I guess if you are thinking about the indigenous population, the style would definitely be two long braids. Among the more European women, I suppose the style is more like mine. Yes, the single ponytail is very chic.

      Hope your week is going well, my friend. Sorry to be slow getting back to your comment. Why does life always seem to interfere with blogging? LOL

      Like

  31. I think you and I have a lot in common when it comes to the evolution of our hair styles. Mine is looking nearly the same as yours these days, gray and all. 🙂

    Like

    • SO happy to hear from you today, Robin! I know, the gray has gotten tiring. Just this week I have rethought about the possibility of coloring it again. We shall see. Thanks for stopping by, my friend!

      Like

  32. I think I went through the exact same hair stages as you, except my hair is even finer and thinner. Been there, done that, with the permanents. I’m getting my hair cut next week again. I’m thinking about going shorter again.

    I can’t get over how varied your appearance is in these photos. It’s amazing to me. Maybe I should put a collection together myself and see how I’ve changed. But that might be nothing but demoralizing.

    We’re not getting older, we’re still getting better, right?

    Like

    • Hard to imagine anyone’s hair could be thinner and finer than mine, so I feel your pain, my friend. Will be curious to know if you get a shorter cut.

      Also, interesting to hear that I look so varied, as I can’t tell you have many folks have made that same observation. Interesting. Thanks for stopping by, my friend.

      Like

  33. Hey Kathy I had to tell you about the opening of a drama set around the lives (and possible deaths) of Margaret Gibb and Janet Adler the NY artists and partners. I saw yesterday at the Royal Court Theatre, on Sloane Sq London. You and Sara would have loved it I think. It got 2 standing ovations and that was just the preview! I hope to see it again. It may be worth keeping your eye out for the London theatre reviews online to have a read, it was quite an experimental play by Tim Crouch and so maybe it will not be for everyone but for my money it rocked!

    Like

  34. Boy oh boy, can I relate to this post, Kathy. My hair is the opposite of yours. I have thick unruly frizzy hair which I’ve spent my life trying to straighten and tame. I envy your thin straight hair. What I wouldn’t give to have that! My history of hair is a very bad one and I can’t tell you how many hours of my life I’ve spent fretting over my locks. I so envy people who have naturally perfect hair and don’t have to spend any time or energy on it. You’re brave. I’d be embarrassed to post some of the pictures of my hair history! 🙂 Fun post! xxx

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s